How to Know Yourself: The role of workplace friendships

B C
3 min readOct 11, 2023

In today’s discussion, we delve into the world of workplace friendships. We’ll explore who your most trusted coworker is, what underpins your friendship, how long your bond has endured, and the remarkable ways such friendships can positively influence your career.

Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash

When you envision a typical workweek, it becomes evident that a significant chunk — around 25% — is spent at your workplace. Whether this percentage is higher or lower for you, even 10% or 5%, the time you invest in your job significantly impacts your life, mental well-being, and motivation.

It’s worth recalling an older adage that asserts, “You can’t make friends at work.” This notion may initially appear perplexing. After all, why shouldn’t the place where you dedicate so much of your time be fertile ground for trust, companionship, and lasting connections? Was the skepticism of this older generation due to personal ego and paranoia, or perhaps a reflection of the perceived insincerity of the business world?

However, my own experience paints a different picture. In each of the five companies I’ve worked for, I’ve managed to form at least one deep and enduring friendship. These are friends with whom I take pride in each other’s accomplishments, and we steer clear of the treacherous waters of office politics. We openly share both the highs and lows, although we initially exercised caution when discussing company matters, waiting until we could truly trust one another.

Looking back on these friendships, I ponder what set them apart. Why do some consider workplace friendships superficial while I consider them to be the best kind of friends? The answer becomes clear: creating a positive work environment was paramount to me. This was best achieved through the companionship of a close friend. In addition to this, I was devoid of ulterior motives and held honesty in high regard. The ability to communicate openly, express myself without fear of misinterpretation or career repercussions, became crucial. This transparency eliminated the need for hidden agendas, as we had nothing to hide. Those with whom I had strong relationships shared this commitment to honesty. We didn’t lose ourselves in our roles; we understood that we had nothing to lose, recognizing that our jobs were not about saving the world.

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B C

I am no one and everyone who is sailing with own truths, hope and dreams